The impact of malnutrition and decreased food intake on length of stay, readmission, and mortality in acute care patients

Agarwal, Ekta, Ferguson, Maree, Banks, Merrilyn, Batterham, Marijka, Bauer, Judith, Capra, Sandra, & Isenring, Elisabeth (2012) The impact of malnutrition and decreased food intake on length of stay, readmission, and mortality in acute care patients. Clinical Nutrition Supplements, 7(1), p. 4.

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Abstract

Rationale: The Australasian Nutrition Care Day Survey (ANCDS) evaluated if malnutrition and decreased food intake are independent risk factors for negative outcomes in hospitalised patients.

Methods: A multicentre (56 hospitals) cross-sectional survey was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 evaluated nutritional status (defined by Subjective Global Assessment) and 24-hour food intake recorded as 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% intake. Phase 2 data, which included length of stay (LOS), readmissions and mortality, were collected 90 days post-Phase 1. Logistic regression was used to control for confounders: age, gender, disease type and severity (using Patient Clinical Complexity Level scores).

Results: Of 3122 participants (53% males, mean age: 65±18 years) 32% were malnourished and 23% consumed�25% of the offered food. Median LOS for malnourished (MN) patients was higher than well-nourished (WN) patients (15 vs. 10 days, p<0.0001). Median LOS for patients consuming �25% of the food was higher than those consuming �50% (13 vs. 11 days, p<0.0001). MN patients had higher readmission rates (36% vs. 30%, p = 0.001). The odds ratios of 90-day in-hospital mortality were 1.8 times greater for MN patients (CI: 1.03 3.22, p = 0.04) and 2.7 times greater for those consuming �25% of the offered food (CI: 1.54 4.68, p = 0.001).

Conclusion: The ANCDS demonstrates that malnutrition and/or decreased food intake are associated with longer LOS and readmissions. The survey also establishes that malnutrition and decreased food intake are independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality in acute care patients; and highlights the need for appropriate nutritional screening and support during hospitalisation. Disclosure of Interest: None Declared.

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ID Code: 57252
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: malnutrition, decreased food intake, health outcomes, acute care
DOI: 10.1016/S1744-1161(12)70009-1
ISSN: 1744-1161
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Deposited On: 18 Feb 2013 00:22
Last Modified: 17 May 2016 04:14

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