Are we keeping the bastards honest? Perceptions of corruption, integrity and influence on politics

Bean, Clive S. (2012) Are we keeping the bastards honest? Perceptions of corruption, integrity and influence on politics. In Pietsch, Juliet & Aarons, Haydn (Eds.) Australia : Identity, Fear and Governance in the 21st Century. Australian National University E Press, Canberra, pp. 95-106.

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Abstract

The words of the late Don Chipp, the founder of the Australian Democrats, have a perennial relevance to politics. When Chipp talked about ‘keeping the bastards honest’, it related to a minor political party playing a role of keeping the major political parties true to their word (Warhurst 1997). Yet it is also a democratic role that citizens play on an ongoing basis, particularly through the mechanism of elections. At the ballot box, governments that are widely perceived to have acted with a lack of integrity are roundly punished. This chapter explores public opinion on issues of integrity, corruption, influence and trust in politics and politicians in Australia. The evidence paints a differentiated picture of a public which sees little sign of overtly corrupt political practices but on the other hand does not feel terribly influential and is not always confident of fair treatment from public officials...

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ID Code: 57444
Item Type: Book Chapter
Keywords: Political attitudes, Corruption, Political influence
ISBN: 9781922144065
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600) > Australian Government and Politics (160601)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600) > Citizenship (160602)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 Australian National University E Press
Deposited On: 21 Feb 2013 23:21
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2015 23:38

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