Mid-gestation intra-amniotic infection with Ureaplasma parvum is resolved within spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus) by term delivery: but caused chronic infection of fetal lungs and placentae

Knox, C. L., Bryan, E. R., Pasco, R., Rodgers, K., Sweeney, E. L., Dickinson, H., Polglase, G. R., Tolcos, M., Walker, D. W., & Moss, T. J. M. (2013) Mid-gestation intra-amniotic infection with Ureaplasma parvum is resolved within spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus) by term delivery: but caused chronic infection of fetal lungs and placentae. Journal Of Paediatrics And Child Health, 49(S2), pp. 91-92.

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Abstract

Background: Ureaplasma species in amniotic fluid at the time of second-trimester amniocentesis increases the risk of preterm birth, but most affected pregnancies continue to term (Gerber et al. J Infect Dis 2003). We aimed to model intra-amniotic (IA) ureaplasma infection in spiny mice, a species with a relatively long gestation (39 days) that allows investigation of the disposition and possible clearance of ureaplasmas in the feto-placental compartment. Method: Pregnant spiny mice received IA injections of U. parvum serovar 6 (10µL, 1x104 colony-forming-units in PBS) or 10B media (10µL; control) at 20 days (d) of gestation (term=39d). At 37d fetuses (n=3 ureaplasma, n=4 control) were surgically delivered and tissues were collected for; bacterial culture, ureaplasma mba and urease gene expression by PCR, tissue WBC counts and indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) staining using anti-ureaplasma serovar 6 (rabbit) antiserum. Maternal and fetal plasma IgG was measured by Western blot. Results: Ureaplasmas were not detected by culture or PCR in fetal or maternal tissues but were visualized by IFA within placental and fetal lung tissues, in association with inflammatory changes and elevated WBC counts (p<0.0001). Anti-ureaplasma IgG was detected in maternal (2/2 tested) and fetal (1/2 tested) plasma but not in controls (0/3). Conclusions: IA injection of ureaplasmas in mid-gestation spiny mice caused persistent fetal lung and placental infection even though ureaplasmas were undetectable using standard culture or PCR techniques. This is consistent with resolution of IA infection, which may occur in human pregnancies that continue to term despite detection of ureaplasmas in mid-gestation.

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ID Code: 59680
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Ureaplasma species, animal model, Spiny mice, intra-amniotic infection, chorioamnionitis, fetal lung infection, indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA), immunohistochemistry
DOI: 10.1111/jpc.12133
ISSN: 10344810
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Infectious Diseases (110309)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PAEDIATRICS AND REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE (111400)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PAEDIATRICS AND REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE (111400) > Foetal Development and Medicine (111401)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 The Authors. Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal College of Physicians
Deposited On: 06 May 2013 00:57
Last Modified: 06 May 2013 22:39

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