QUT ePrints

Science Stories: Selecting the Source Animal for Xenotransplantation

Cook, Peta S. (2006) Science Stories: Selecting the Source Animal for Xenotransplantation. In Hall, Carly & Hopkinson, Chanel (Eds.) Social Change in the 21st Century Conference, 27th October 2006, Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

Xenotransplantation (animal-to-human transplantation) involves implanting, infusing or transplanting living animal tissues, cells or organs into a human recipient. The aim is to alleviate or eliminate human health conditions that prevent the individual from living the 'good life'. Hence, xenotransplantation is constructed as a potential and needed solution to fixing 'abnormal' bodies. By crossing species barriers, however, this technology is not without its complexities and uncertainties. Importantly, xenotransplantation intimately intertwines animals and humans, which may challenge sacred boundaries such as animal/human, subject/object and us/them, while posing new questions about ontology.

To deal with such complexities and potential hybridities, official science attempts to stabilise constructed knowledges of animals. This primarily targets knowledges on animals of interest as human organ sources, specifically nonhuman primates and pigs. Ironically, this approach also involves complicating our understandings of the concordance and discordance between nonhuman primates, pigs and humans. Utilising Irwin and Michael's (2003) ethno-epistemic assemblages, I explore how official science selects an animal as an organ source for humans. By employing what I have called a comparative continuum, it is revealed how official science fashions animal identities on degrees of dissimilarities and similarities to humans, and how, through such negotiations, official science constructs its position of authority. This reveals how official science creates complex and sometimes contradictory truth-claims and stories about nonhuman primates and pigs.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

723 since deposited on 11 Jan 2007
51 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 5977
Item Type: Conference Paper
Keywords: xenotransplantation, animals, ethno, epistemic assemblage, hybrids, science and technology studies (STS)
ISBN: 1741071291
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (220000) > PHILOSOPHY (220300) > Ethical Theory (220305)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > IMMUNOLOGY (110700) > Transplantation Immunology (110708)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > IMMUNOLOGY (110700)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (220000) > PHILOSOPHY (220300) > Epistemology (220304)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (220000) > PHILOSOPHY (220300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > IMMUNOLOGY (110700) > Immunogenetics (incl. Genetic Immunology) (110706)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Social Change Research
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > QUT Carseldine - Humanities & Human Services
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2006 Peta S. Cook
Deposited On: 11 Jan 2007
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 22:36

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page