The time course of in vivo recovery of transverse strain in high-stress tendons following exercise

Wearing, Scott C., Smeathers, James E., Hooper, Sue L., Locke, Simon, Purdam, Craig, & Cook, Jill L. (2014) The time course of in vivo recovery of transverse strain in high-stress tendons following exercise. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48, pp. 383-387.

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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the time course of the recovery of transverse strain in the Achilles and patellar tendon following a bout of resistance exercise.

Methods

Seventeen healthy adults underwent sonographic examination of the right patellar (n=9) and Achilles (n=8) tendons immediately prior to and following 90 repetitions of weight-bearing quadriceps and gastrocnemius-resistance exercise performed against an effective resistance of 175% and 250% body weight, respectively. Sagittal tendon thickness was determined 20 mm from the enthesis and transverse strain, as defined by the stretch ratio, was repeatedly monitored over a 24 h recovery period.

Results

Resistance exercise resulted in an immediate decrease in Achilles (t7=10.6, p<0.01) and patellar (t8=8.9, p<0.01) tendon thickness, resulting in an average transverse stretch ratio of 0.86±0.04 and 0.82±0.05, which was not significantly different between tendons. The magnitude of the immediate transverse strain response, however, was reduced with advancing age (r=0.63, p<0.01). Recovery in transverse strain was prolonged compared with the duration of loading and exponential in nature. The average primary recovery time was not significantly different between the Achilles (6.5±3.2 h) and patellar (7.1±3.2 h) tendons. Body weight accounted for 62% and 64% of the variation in recovery time, respectively.

Conclusions

Despite structural and biochemical differences between the Achilles and patellar tendon, the mechanisms underlying transverse creep recovery in vivo appear similar and are highly time dependent. These novel findings have important implications concerning the time required for the mechanical recovery of high-stress tendons following an acute bout of exercise.

Impact and interest:

3 citations in Scopus
4 citations in Web of Science®
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ID Code: 60332
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Export Date: 22 May 2013. Source: Scopus. Article in Press. CODEN: BJSMD: doi 10.1136/bjsports-2012-091707. Language of Original Document: English. Correspondence Address: Wearing, S.C.; Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD 4229, Australia, email: swearing@bond.edu.au
Keywords: Ultrasound, diametral strain, viscoelastic creep
DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2012-091707
ISSN: 0306-3674
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHYSICAL SCIENCES (020000) > OTHER PHYSICAL SCIENCES (029900) > Biological Physics (029901)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHYSICAL SCIENCES (020000) > OTHER PHYSICAL SCIENCES (029900) > Medical Physics (029903)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Biomechanics (110601)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Funding:
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 Please consult the authors
Deposited On: 26 Aug 2013 22:47
Last Modified: 21 Jun 2017 14:47

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