Load bearing improves the limits of agreement for repeated in vivo measures of the speed of sound in human Achilles tendon

Smeathers, J.E., Wearing, S., Hooper, S., Locke, S., & Grigg, N. (2011) Load bearing improves the limits of agreement for repeated in vivo measures of the speed of sound in human Achilles tendon. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 14(Supp 1), e46-e47.

[img]
Preview
PDF (86kB)

View at publisher

Abstract

Axial acoustic wave propagation has been widely used in evaluating the mechanical properties of human bone in vivo. However, application of this technique to monitor soft tissues, such as tendon, has received comparatively little scientific attention. Laboratory-based research has established that axial acoustic wave transmission is not only related to the physical properties of equine tendon but is also proportional to tensile load to which it is exposed (Miles et al., 1996; Pourcelot et al., 2005). The reproducibility of the technique for in vivo measurements in human tendon, however, has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the limits of agreement for repeated measures of the speed of sound (SoS) in human Achilles tendon in vivo. Methods: A custom built ultrasound device, consisting of an A-mode 1MHz emitter and two regularly spaced receivers, was used to measure the SoS in the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon in ten healthy males and ten females (mean age: 33.8 years, range 23-56 yrs; height: 1.73±0.08 m; weight: 68.4±15.3 kg). The emitter and receivers were held at fixed positions by a polyethylene frame and maintained in close contact with the skin overlying the tendon by means of elasticated straps. Repeated SoS measurements were taken with the subject prone (non-weightbearing and relaxed Achilles tendon) and during quiet bipedal and unipedal stance. In each instance, the device was detached and repositioned prior to measurement. Results: Limits of agreement for repeated SoS measures during non-weightbearing and bipedal and unipedal stance were ±53, ±28 and ±21 m/s, respectively. The average SoS in the non-weightbearing Achilles tendon was 1804±198 m/s. There was a significant increase in the average SoS during bilateral (2122±135 m/s) (P < 0.05) and unilateral (2221±79 m/s) stance (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Repeated SoS measures in human Achilles tendon were more reliable during stance than under non-weightbearing conditions. These findings are consistent with previous research in equine tendon in which lower variability in SoS was observed with increasing tensile load (Crevier-Denoix et al, 2009). Since the limits of agreement for Achilles tendon SoS are nearly 5% of the changes previously observed during walking and therapeutic heel raise exercises, acoustic wave transmission provides a promising new non-invasive method for determining tendon properties during sports and rehabilitation related activities.

Impact and interest:

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

28 since deposited on 27 Aug 2013
2 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 60348
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Paper presented in 2011 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport ``Optimising health and fitness–Participation, prevention and performance'' 19–22 October 2011
Keywords: sonography, measurement, repeatability, limits of agreement
DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2011.11.096
ISSN: 1440-2440
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHYSICAL SCIENCES (020000) > OTHER PHYSICAL SCIENCES (029900) > Biological Physics (029901)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHYSICAL SCIENCES (020000) > OTHER PHYSICAL SCIENCES (029900) > Medical Physics (029903)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Biomechanics (110601)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, [VOL 14, ISSUE Supp 1, (2011)] DOI: /10.1016/j.jsams.2011.11.096
Deposited On: 27 Aug 2013 22:39
Last Modified: 29 Aug 2013 05:04

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page