Arguing the Autopsy : mutual suspicion, jurisdictional confusion and the socially marginal

Carpenter, Belinda, Tait, Gordon, Quadrelli, Carol, & (2013) Arguing the Autopsy : mutual suspicion, jurisdictional confusion and the socially marginal. In Crime, Justice and Social Democracy: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference, Crime and Justice Research Centre, Queensland University of Technology, Gardens Point, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 10-18.

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Abstract

Vulnerable and marginalised populations are not only over-represented in the criminal justice system, but also in civil jurisdictions like the coronial system. Moreover, many of the personnel who deal with criminal matters, especially in rural and regional areas, are also those who manage the coronial death investigation. This movement back and forth between civil and criminal jurisdictions is difficult for the both professional personnel and the families, but especially for those families who may also have had dealings with these personnel in the criminal justice system, or who present as suspicious due to larger historical and global issues. While coronial legislation now allows families to raise cultural and religious concerns about the process, particularly to do with the autopsy of their loved one, this also requires them to identify themselves to police at the initial stage of the death investigation. This paper, part of a larger body of work on autopsy decision making, discusses the ways in which this information is gathered by police, how it is communicated through the system, the ways in which families are supported through the process, and the difficulties that ensue.

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ID Code: 61391
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: coroner, inquest, culture, religion, therapeutic jurisprudence
ISBN: 9780987467843
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200) > Courts and Sentencing (160203)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Crime & Justice Research Centre
Current > Schools > School of Cultural & Professional Learning
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Research Centres > Australian Centre for Health Law Research
Current > Schools > School of Justice
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 Crime and Justice Research Centre QUT
Deposited On: 17 Jul 2013 05:08
Last Modified: 12 Feb 2015 19:40

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