Respiratory monitoring practices during procedural sedation and analgesia in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory could be improved by using capnography to assess ventilation

Conway, A., Rolley, J., Page, K., & Fulbrook, P. (2012) Respiratory monitoring practices during procedural sedation and analgesia in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory could be improved by using capnography to assess ventilation. Heart, Lung and Circulation, 21(Supp1), S287-S288.

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Abstract

Background: Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) administered by nurses in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory (CCL) is unlikely to yield serious complications. However, the safety of this practice is dependent on timely identification and treatment of depressed respiratory function.

Aim: Describe respiratory monitoring in the CCL.

Methods: Retrospective medical record audit of adult patients who underwent a procedure in the CCLs of one private hospital in Brisbane during May and June 2010. An electronic database was used to identify subjects and an audit tool ensured data collection was standardised.

Results: Nurses administered PSA during 172/473 (37%) procedures including coronary angiographies, percutaneous coronary interventions, electrophysiology studies, radiofrequency ablations, cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, temporary pacing leads and peripheral vascular interventions. Oxygen saturations were recorded during 160/172 (23%) procedures, respiration rate was recorded during 17/172 (10%) procedures, use of oxygen supplementation was recorded during 40/172 (23%) procedures and 13/172 (7.5%; 95% CI=3.59–11.41%) patients experienced oxygen desaturation.

Conclusion: Although oxygen saturation was routinely documented, nurses did not regularly record respiration observations. It is likely that surgical draping and the requirement to minimise radiation exposure interfered with nurses’ ability to observe respiration. Capnography could overcome these barriers to respiration assessment as its accurate measurement of exhaled carbon dioxide coupled with the easily interpretable waveform output it produces, which displays a breath-by-breath account of ventilation, enables identification of respiratory depression in real-time. Results of this audit emphasise the need to ascertain the clinical benefits associated with using capnography to assess ventilation during PSA in the CCL.

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ID Code: 61454
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Cardiac, Capnography, Nursing, Deep sedation, Conscious sedation
DOI: 10.1016/j.hlc.2012.05.704
ISSN: 1443-9506
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE AND HAEMATOLOGY (110200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Deposited On: 18 Jul 2013 23:16
Last Modified: 18 Jul 2013 23:16

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