Development status and future prospects for a vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis infection

Hafner, Louise M., Wilson, David P., & Timms, Peter (2014) Development status and future prospects for a vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Vaccine, 32(14), pp. 1563-1571.

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Chlamydia trachomatis continues to be the most commonly reported sexually transmitted bacterial infection in many countries with more than 100 million new cases estimated annually. These acute infections translate into significant downstream health care costs, particularly for women, where complications can include pelvic inflammatory disease and other disease sequelae such as tubal factor infertility. Despite years of research, the immunological mechanisms responsible for protective immunity versus immunopathology are still not well understood, although it is widely accepted that T cell driven IFN-g and Th17 responses are critical for clearing infection. While antibodies are able to neutralize infections in vitro, alone they are not protective, indicating that any successful vaccine will need to elicit both arms of the immune response. In recent years, there has been an expansion in the number and types of antigens that have been evaluated as vaccines, and combined with the new array of mucosal adjuvants, this aspect of chlamydial vaccinology is showing promise. Most recently, the opportunities to develop successful vaccines have been given a significant boost with the development of a genetic transformation system for Chlamydia, as well as the identification of the key role of the chlamydial plasmid in virulence. While still remaining a major challenge, the development of a successful C.trachomatis vaccine is starting to look more likely.

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21 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 62116
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Chlamydia, Vaccines, WHO special issue
DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.08.020
ISSN: 0264-410X
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Crown Copyright 2013
Copyright Statement: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Vaccine. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Vaccine, [Volume 32, Issue 14, (20 March 2014)] DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2013.08.020
Deposited On: 27 Aug 2013 22:53
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2015 16:16

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