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Tools and Outcomes: Computer music systems and musical directions

Brown, Andrew R. (1999) Tools and Outcomes: Computer music systems and musical directions. In Australasian Computer Music Conference 1999, July 7, Wellington, New Zealand.

Abstract

In the changing context of computer music composition where the computer becomes a commodity rather than a novelty, this paper examines the composers' relationship with the computer and how that relates to music making. Computer music making has a history of close association between tool making and music making. This relationship was first forged out of necessity, then out of interest and a dedication to new ways of composing and performing. At the turn of the century, after 50 years of computer music, computers are becoming just another musical instrument. With the development of a wide range of computer music software and hardware, tool making is no longer a necessity for computer music making, nor perhaps even a badge of honour.

In this paper I seek to present a broader understanding of computer music systems and musical directions by expanding the context in which computer music tools are examined to include the ever-changing social and personal situation of their users. From this perspective it is proposed that while the music is indeed influenced by the computing tools, it is in a way less direct and more complex than previously assumed. The causal effect for composers of tools on outcomes is neither direct nor consistent, I argue, and is less significant than cultural context of and personal engagement with the tools.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 6215
Item Type: Conference Paper
Keywords: music, sound, computer, technology
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING (190000) > PERFORMING ARTS AND CREATIVE WRITING (190400) > Musicology and Ethnomusicology (190409)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 1999 Andrew R. Brown
Deposited On: 14 Feb 2007
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 22:37

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