Driver perceptions of the benefits of reducing their driving speed on safety, emissions, and stress and road rage

Debnath, A.K., Haworth, N.L., Rakotonirainy, A., Graves, G., & Jeffreys, I. (2013) Driver perceptions of the benefits of reducing their driving speed on safety, emissions, and stress and road rage. In Proceedings of the 2013 Australasian Road Safety Research, Policing & Education Conference, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Brisbane, QLD.

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Abstract

The existing literature shows driving speed significantly affects levels of safety, emissions, and stress in driving. In addition, drivers who feel tense when driving have been found to drive more slowly than others. These findings were mostly obtained from crash data analyses or field studies, and less is known regarding driver perceptions of the extent to which reducing their driving speed would improve road safety, reduce their car’s emissions, and reduce stress and road rage. This paper uses ordered probit regression models to analyse responses from 3538 Queensland drivers who completed an online RACQ survey. Drivers most strongly agreed that reducing their driving speed would improve road safety, less strongly agreed that reducing their driving speed would reduce their car’s emissions and least strongly agreed that reducing their driving speed would reduce stress and road rage. Younger drivers less strongly agreed that these benefits would occur than older drivers. Drivers of automatic cars and those who are bicycle commuters agreed more to these benefits than other drivers. Female drivers agreed more strongly than males on improving safety and reducing stress and road rage. Type of fuel used, engine size, driving experience, and distance driven per week were also found to be associated with driver perceptions, although these were not found to be significant in all of the regression models. The findings from this study may help in developing targeted training or educational measures to improve drivers’ willingness to reduce their driving speed.

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ID Code: 62541
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Traffic safety, Driver perception, Speeding, Eco drive, Vehicle emissions, Driving stress, Road rage
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > CIVIL ENGINEERING (090500) > Transport Engineering (090507)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > OTHER PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (179900) > Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified (179999)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 [please consult the author]
Deposited On: 16 Sep 2013 22:21
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2013 04:35

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