Polymorphisms of the SIPA1 gene and sporadic breast cancer susceptibility

Hsieh, Szu-Min, Smith, Robert A., Lintell, Nicholas A., Hunter, Kent W., & Griffiths, Lyn R. (2009) Polymorphisms of the SIPA1 gene and sporadic breast cancer susceptibility. BMC Cancer, 9(1), p. 331.

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Background The novel breast cancer metastasis modulator gene signal-induced proliferation-associated 1 (Sipa1) underlies the breast cancer metastasis efficiency modifier locus Mtes 1 and has been shown to influence mammary tumour metastatic efficiency in the mouse, with an ectopically expressing Sipa1 cell line developing 1.5 to 2 fold more surface pulmonary metastases. Sipa1 encodes a mitogen-inducible GTPase activating (GAP) protein for members of the Ras-related proteins; participates in cell adhesion and modulates mitogen-induced cell cycle progression. Germline SIPA1 SNPs showed association with positive lymph node metastasis and hormonal receptor status in a Caucasian cohort. We hypothesized that SIPA1 may also be correlated to breast carcinoma incidence as well as prognosis. Therefore, this study investigated the potential relationship of SIPA1 and human breast cancer incidence by a germline SNP genotype frequency association study in a case-control Caucasian cohort in Queensland, Australia.

Methods The SNPs genotyped in this study were identified in a previous study and the genotyping assays were carried out using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The data were analysed with chi-square method and the Monte Carlo style CLUMP analysis program.

Results Results indicated significance with SIPA1 SNP rs3741378; the CC genotype was more frequently observed in the breast cancer group compared to the disease-free control group, indicating the variant C allele was associated with increased breast cancer incidence.

Conclusion This observation indicates SNP rs3741378 as a novel potential sporadic breast cancer predisposition SNP. While it showed association with hormonal receptor status in breast cancer group in a previous pilot study, this exonic missense SNP (Ser (S) to Phe (F)) changes a hydrophilic residue (S) to a hydrophobic residue (F) and may significantly alter the protein functions of SIPA1 in breast tumourgenesis. SIPA1 SNPs rs931127 (5' near gene), and rs746429 (synonymous (Ala (A) to Ala (A)), did not show significant associations with breast cancer incidence, yet were associated with lymph node metastasis in the previous study. This suggests that SIPA1 may be involved in different stages of breast carcinogenesis and since this study replicates a previous study of the associated SNP, it implicates variants of the SIPA1 gene as playing a potential role in breast cancer.

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ID Code: 62643
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-9-331
ISSN: 1471-2407
Divisions: Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2009 the authors
Deposited On: 18 Sep 2013 05:13
Last Modified: 07 Aug 2014 16:46

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