Moving MobileMums forward: protocol for a larger randomized controlled trial of an improved physical activity program for women with young children

Marshall, Alison L., Miller, Y. D., Graves, Nicholas, Barnett, Adrian G., & Fjeldsoe, Brianna S. (2013) Moving MobileMums forward: protocol for a larger randomized controlled trial of an improved physical activity program for women with young children. BMC Public Health, 13(593), pp. 1-10.

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Abstract

Background: Women with young children (under 5 years) are a key population group for physical activity intervention. Previous evidence highlights the need for individually tailored programs with flexible delivery mechanisms for this group. Our previous pilot study suggested that an intervention primarily delivered via mobile phone text messaging (MobileMums) increased self-reported physical activity in women with young children. An improved version of the MobileMums program is being compared with a minimal contact control group in a large randomised controlled trial (RCT).

Methods/design: This RCT will evaluate the efficacy, feasibility and acceptability, cost-effectiveness, mediators and moderators of the MobileMums program. Primary (moderate-vigorous physical activity) and secondary (intervention implementation data, health service use costs, intervention costs, health benefits, theoretical constructs) outcomes are assessed at baseline, 3-months (end of intervention) and 9-months (following 6-month no contact: maintenance period).

The trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12611000481976; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=336109).The intervention commences with a face-to-face session with a behavioural counsellor to initiate rapport and gather information for tailoring the 12-week text message program. During the program participants also have access to a: MobileMums Participant Handbook, MobileMums refrigerator magnet, MobileMums Facebook(C) group, and a MobileMums website with a searchable, on-line exercise directory. A nominated support person also receives text messages for 12-weeks encouraging them to offer their MobileMum social support for physical activity.

Discussion: Results of this trial will determine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the MobileMums program, and the feasibility of delivering it in a community setting. It will inform the broader literature of physical activity interventions for women with young children and determine whether further investment in the translation of the program is warranted.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 63478
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Postnatal, Exercise, Text message, SMS, Mobile telephone, Intervention
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-593
ISSN: 1471-2458
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Funding:
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 Marshall et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Copyright Statement: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Deposited On: 17 Oct 2013 23:08
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2014 18:06

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