Migrating to a sustainable energy system : distributed generation and storage, fuel cells and hypercars

Simpson, Andrew G., Greaves, Matthew C., & Walker, Geoffrey R. (2000) Migrating to a sustainable energy system : distributed generation and storage, fuel cells and hypercars. In Krivda, A. (Ed.) AUPEC 2000 : Innovation for Secure Power, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, pp. 289-294.

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Abstract

This paper examines a number of issues in sustainable energy generation and distribution, and explores avenues that are available for integration of our society’s energy supplies. In particular, the paper presents a way in which transport vehicle energy supplies could be integrated with distributed generation schemes to achieve synergistic and beneficial outcomes. The worldwide energy system contains fundamental problems that result directly from the use of unsustainable fuels and a lack of energy system integration. There is a need to adopt an integrated, sustainable energy system for our society. The adoption of distributed generation could result in beneficial restructuring of the energy trade, and a change in the role of energy providers. Inherent benefits in distributed generation schemes would directly combat barriers to installation of renewable generation facilities, which might prove distributed renewable energy sources to be more feasible. The presence of fuel cells, batteries, power electronic inverters and intelligent controls in vehicles of the future provides many opportunities for the integration of vehicle energy supplies into a distributed generation scheme. In such a system, vehicles could play a major role in power generation and storage.

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ID Code: 63587
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
ISBN: 1864354968
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING (090200) > Hybrid Vehicles and Powertrains (090205)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING (090600) > Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl. Renewable Power) (090607)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING (090600) > Renewable Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl. Solar Cells) (090608)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2000 [please consult the author]
Deposited On: 04 Mar 2014 22:35
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2014 16:53

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