MS-based metabolomics facilitates the discovery of in vivo functional small molecules with a diversity of biological contexts

Yan, Leyu, Nie, Wenna, Parker, Tony, Upton, Zee, & Lu, Haitao (2013) MS-based metabolomics facilitates the discovery of in vivo functional small molecules with a diversity of biological contexts. Future medicinal chemistry, 5(16), pp. 1953-1965.

View at publisher

Abstract

In vivo small molecules as necessary intermediates are involved in numerous critical metabolic pathways and biological processes associated with many essential biological functions and events. There is growing evidence that MS-based metabolomics is emerging as a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of functional small molecules that can better our understanding of development, infection, nutrition, disease, toxicity, drug therapeutics, gene modifications and host-pathogen interaction from metabolic perspectives. However, further progress must still be made in MS-based metabolomics because of the shortcomings in the current technologies and knowledge. This technique-driven review aims to explore the discovery of in vivo functional small molecules facilitated by MS-based metabolomics and to highlight the analytic capabilities and promising applications of this discovery strategy. Moreover, the biological significance of the discovery of in vivo functional small molecules with different biological contexts is also interrogated at a metabolic perspective.

Impact and interest:

6 citations in Scopus
6 citations in Web of Science®
Search Google Scholar™

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 63925
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.4155/fmc.13.148
ISSN: 1756-8927
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Deposited On: 03 Nov 2013 22:16
Last Modified: 28 Jan 2014 00:55

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page