Australian Diabetes Foot Network : practical guideline on the provision of footwear for people with diabetes

Bergin, Shan M, Nube, Vanessa L, Alford, Jan B, Allard, Bernard P, Gurr, Joel M, Holland, Emma L, Horsley, Mark W, Kamp, Maarten C, Lazzarini, Peter A, Sinha, Ashim K, Warnock, Jason T, & Wraight, Paul R (2013) Australian Diabetes Foot Network : practical guideline on the provision of footwear for people with diabetes. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, 6(1), p. 6.

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Abstract

Trauma, in the form of pressure and/or friction from footwear, is a common cause of foot ulceration in people with diabetes. These practical recommendations regarding the provision of footwear for people with diabetes were agreed upon following review of existing position statements and clinical guidelines. The aim of this process was not to re-invent existing guidelines but to provide practical guidance for health professionals on how they can best deliver these recommendations within the Australian health system. Where information was lacking or inconsistent, a consensus was reached following discussion by all authors. Appropriately prescribed footwear, used alone or in conjunction with custom-made foot orthoses, can reduce pedal pressures and reduce the risk of foot ulceration. It is important for all health professionals involved in the care of people with diabetes to both assess and make recommendations on the footwear needs of their clients or to refer to health professionals with such skills and knowledge. Individuals with more complex footwear needs (for example those who require custom-made medical grade footwear and orthoses) should be referred to health professionals with experience in the prescription of these modalities and who are able to provide appropriate and timely follow-up. Where financial disadvantage is a barrier to individuals acquiring appropriate footwear, health care professionals should be aware of state and territory based equipment funding schemes that can provide financial assistance. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people living in rural and remote areas are likely to have limited access to a broad range of footwear. Provision of appropriate footwear to people with diabetes in these communities needs be addressed as part of a comprehensive national strategy to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications on the health system.

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ID Code: 66062
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: footwear, diabetes, foot, guideline, Australia
DOI: 10.1186/1757-1146-6-6
ISSN: 1757-1146
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Clinical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: © 2013 Bergin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Copyright Statement: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Deposited On: 12 Jan 2014 23:33
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2014 01:38

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