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Australian Universities and International Standards: Compliance with the 1997 UNESCO Recommendation Concerning the Status of Higher Education Teaching Personnel

Page, James S. (2007) Australian Universities and International Standards: Compliance with the 1997 UNESCO Recommendation Concerning the Status of Higher Education Teaching Personnel. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 29(1), pp. 95-101.

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Abstract

Soft law, that is, regulation which is technically unenforceable, is one means whereby international ethical and professional standards are now increasingly enunciated. This paper looks at one specific standard-setting instrument, the 1997 UNESCO Recommendation Concerning the Status of Higher Education Teaching Personnel, and compliance with this standard by Australian universities. It is concluded that this specific standard-setting instrument is routinely ignored by Australian universities, specifically on the issues of commensurability of pay and recognition of research work for casual academics. There are many possible reasons for this failure to comply with the 1997 Recommendation, although three suggested reasons are 1) ignorance within Australian higher education regarding international standards and the ethical obligations associated with such standards, 2) the dominance of a neo-liberal agenda within higher education in Australia, and 3) a trend towards disregarding international standards and institutions generally by Australia. It is suggested that the solution to this is situation is not simple, although education and publicity may be two starting points. Through this it may be possible to encourage a greater degree of ethical and professional commitment on the part of Australian universities, and possibly within the universities of other countries.

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ID Code: 6628
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: UNESCO, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, ILO, International Labour Organization, Australian universities, soft law, hard law, academics, research work, standard, setting instruments, international instruments, international governance, international law, ethical standards, professional standards, international standards, neo, liberal agenda, norms and principles, compliance, non, compliance, noncompliance, compulsion, voluntay compliance, labour standards, General Conference, legislation, management of higher education, United Nations, industrial justice, well, ordered society, credibility of Australian universities, basic social institutions, failure to meet international standards, unilateralism, commensurability, commensurate, remuneration, ignorance, casualization, workforce, entitlements, Enterprise Bargaining Agreements, industrial awards, autonomy, autonomous, academic independence, moral and ethical persuasion, moral persuasion, AVCC, Australian Vice, Chancellors Committee, publicity, international students, cultural change, James Smith Page, James Page
DOI: 10.1080/13600800601175813
ISSN: 1469-9508
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100) > International Law (excl. International Trade Law) (180116)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100) > Administrative Law (180103)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (150300) > Human Resources Management (150305)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > APPLIED ECONOMICS (140200) > Labour Economics (140211)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Public Administration (160509)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Taylor & Francis
Copyright Statement: First published in Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management 29(1):pp. 95-101
Deposited On: 20 Mar 2007
Last Modified: 01 Sep 2010 22:40

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