Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss : compensatory behavioral adaptations

Melanson, Edward L., Keadle, Sarch K., Donnelly, Joseph E., Braun, Barry, & King, Neil A. (2013) Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss : compensatory behavioral adaptations. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(8), pp. 1600-1609.

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Abstract

In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect.

Impact and interest:

15 citations in Scopus
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17 citations in Web of Science®

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52 since deposited on 20 Jan 2014
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ID Code: 66395
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31828ba942
ISSN: 0195-9131
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 American College of Sports Medicine
Deposited On: 20 Jan 2014 02:53
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2014 02:02

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