Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is associated with a decreased folate status in women of childbearing age

Borradale, David, Isenring, Elisabeth A., Hacker, Elke, & Kimlin, Michael G. (2014) Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is associated with a decreased folate status in women of childbearing age. Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B : Biology, 131, pp. 90-95.

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Abstract

In vitro studies indicate that folate in collected human blood is vulnerable to degradation after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This has raised concerns about folate depletion in individuals with high sun exposure. Here, we investigate the association between personal solar UV radiation exposure and serum folate concentration, using a three-week prospective study that was undertaken in females aged 18–47 years in Brisbane, Australia (153 E, 27 S). Following two weeks of supplementation with 500 μg of folic acid daily, the change in serum folate status was assessed over a 7-day period of measured personal sun exposure. Compared to participants with personal UV exposures of <200 Joules per day, participants with personal UV exposures of 200–599 and >600 Joules per day had significantly higher depletion of serum folate (p = 0.015). Multivariable analysis revealed personal UV exposure as the strongest predictor accounting for 20% of the overall change in serum folate (Standardised B = −0.49; t = −3.75; p = <0.01). These data show that increasing solar UV radiation exposures reduces the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation. The consequences of this association may be most pronounced for vulnerable individuals, such as women who are pregnant or of childbearing age with high sun exposures.

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9 citations in Scopus
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6 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 67491
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Folate, Folic acid, Photodegradation, Solar ultraviolet radiation
DOI: 10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2014.01.002
ISSN: 1011-1344
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B : Biology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B : Biology, [VOL 131, (2014)] DOI: 10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2014.01.002
Deposited On: 18 Feb 2014 22:49
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2016 16:10

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