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Medical Marginalisation of Aboriginal Australians: Renal Transplantation and Xenotransplantation

Cook, Peta S. (2005) Medical Marginalisation of Aboriginal Australians: Renal Transplantation and Xenotransplantation. In Julian, Roberta, Rottier, Reannan, & White, Rob (Eds.) The Australian Sociological Association 2005 Annual Conference, 5 - 8 December 2005, University of Tasmania, Sandy Bay Campus.

Abstract

The suffering of end-stage renal disease in Aboriginal Australians is significant. The demand of Aboriginal Australians on renal replacement therapies such as dialysis and transplantation however, does not equate to this need. This can be partially attributed to institutional racism, which perpetuates health marginalisation by embracing dominant value and belief systems. In this light, new technological developments such as xenotransplantation need to be addressed with consideration of not only their own inherent complexities, but also within existing institutionalised cultural assumptions. Therefore, this highlights a need to consider existing health disparities and transplant outcomes in Aboriginal community, in order to effectively develop xenotransplantation guidelines. In turn, the Australian community as a whole should be aware of such cultural issues in order to make informed decisions, and to provide informed consent.

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ID Code: 6752
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional URLs:
Keywords: xenotransplantation, end, stage renal disease, racism, Aboriginal Australians
ISBN: 0-9598460-5-0
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900) > Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society (169902)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Public Policy (160510)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Sociology and Social Studies of Science and Technology (160808)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > QUT Carseldine - Humanities & Human Services
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 (please consult author)
Copyright Statement: The contents of this conference paper can be freely accessed online via the journal’s web page (see hypertext link).
Deposited On: 29 Mar 2007
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2009 17:25

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