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A randomised controlled trial comparing lifestyle groups, individual counselling and written information in the management of weight and health outcomes over 12 months

Ash, Susan, Reeves, Marina M., Bauer, Judith D., Dover, Thomas , Vivanti, Angela P., Leong, Cliff K. , O'Moore-Sullivan, Trisha , & Capra, Sandra M. (2006) A randomised controlled trial comparing lifestyle groups, individual counselling and written information in the management of weight and health outcomes over 12 months. International Journal of Obesity, 30(10), pp. 1557-1564.

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of an 8 week group based cognitive behaviour therapy intervention on change in weight and other weight related variables, change in physical activity and change in health and well being compared to individualised dietetic treatment or giving information only

Design: A randomised control trial with an 8-week intervention period – two intervention groups, a group based cognitive behaviour therapy intervention, Fat Booters Inc – (FBI) and individualised dietetic treatment (IDT) and control group receiving an information booklet only (BO). Intervention for 8 weeks with monthly follow-up to 6 months and further follow-up at 12 months, conducted in real practice setting.

Subjects: A total of 176 adults with body mass index (BMI) > 27kg/m2, mean (+/-SD) age 48+/-13 years, mean BMI 34+/-5.5 kg/m2.

Main Outcome Measures: Weight, percent body fat, waist circumference, physical activity, health status, self-efficacy and satisfaction with life were measured at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months.

Results: A statistically significant difference between groups was observed for weight change over time (p = 0.05). The change in weight (mean ± se) for the FBI group was significantly greater than the BO group at 6 and 12 months (-2.8 ± 0.7 compared to –1.0 ± 0.6 kg, p<0.05 and –2.9 ± 0.9 compared to +0.5 ± 0.9 kg, p<0.005, respectively). Change in weight in the IDT group did not differ from the FBI group at any time point. For all groups, waist circumference was significantly less than baseline at all time points (p<0.001). Significant differences in self-efficacy were observed over time (p=0.02), with both intervention groups having greater self-efficacy than the BO group. Significant drop-outs occurred over time for all three groups.

Conclusions: A cognitive behaviour based intervention was more effective than providing information alone and as effective as intensive individualised dietetic intervention in weight loss and improvements in self-efficacy. The FBI group was more cost effective to conduct in a real practice setting.

Impact and interest:

24 citations in Scopus
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22 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 6757
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Lifestyle Group, Weight Loss, Dietetic Counselling, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Costs
DOI: 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803263
ISSN: 0307-0565
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100) > Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified (111199)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Counselling (111710)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2006 Nature Publishing Group
Deposited On: 29 Mar 2007
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 13:21

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