Heat strain and hydration status of surface mine blast crew workers

Hunt, Andrew P., Parker, Anthony W., & Stewart, Ian B. (2014) Heat strain and hydration status of surface mine blast crew workers. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 56(4), pp. 409-414.

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Abstract

Objective

Dehydration and symptoms of heat illness are common among the surface mining workforce. This investigation aimed to determine whether heat strain and hydration status exceeded recommended limits.

Methods

Fifteen blast crew personnel operating in the tropics were monitored across a 12-hour shift. Heart rate, core body temperature, and urine-specific gravity were continuously recorded. Participants self-reported fluid consumption and completed a heat illness symptom inventory.

Results

Core body temperature averaged 37.46 +/- 0.13[degrees]C, with the group maximum 37.98 +/- 0.19[degrees]C. Mean urine-specific gravity was 1.024 +/- 0.007, with 78.6% of samples 1.020 or more. Seventy-three percent of workers reported at least one symptom of heat illness during the shift.

Conclusions

Core body temperature remained within the recommended limits; however, more than 80% of workers were dehydrated before commencing the shift, and tended to remain so for the duration.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
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5 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 68279
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: heat strain, dehydration, core temperature, physiological strain
DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000114
ISSN: 1076-2752
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Exercise Physiology (110602)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Deposited On: 12 Mar 2014 03:07
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2014 05:32

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