Broadening the focus : the case for lifestyle journalism as a field of scholarly inquiry

Hanusch, Folker (2012) Broadening the focus : the case for lifestyle journalism as a field of scholarly inquiry. Journalism Practice, 6(1), pp. 2-11.

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Abstract

This introduction to the special issue outlines the case for an increased focus on studying lifestyle journalism, an area of journalism which, despite its rapid rise over recent decades, has not received much attention from scholars in journalism studies. Criticised for being antithetical to public interest and watchdog notions of journalism, lifestyle journalism is still ridiculed by some as being unworthy of being associated with the term journalism. However, in outlining the field's development and a critique of definitions of journalism, this paper argues that there are a number of good reasons for broadening the focus. In fact, lifestyle journalism?here defined as a distinct journalistic field that primarily addresses its audiences as consumers, providing them with factual information and advice, often in entertaining ways, about goods and services they can use in their daily lives?has much to offer for scholarly inquiry and is of increasing relevance for society.

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ID Code: 68296
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: lifestyle, consumerism, service, journalism, soft news, market-oriented
DOI: 10.1080/17512786.2011.622895
ISSN: 1751-2794
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING (190000) > JOURNALISM AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING (190300) > Journalism Studies (190301)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Past > Schools > Journalism, Media & Communication
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 Routledge
Deposited On: 12 Mar 2014 03:16
Last Modified: 09 Apr 2014 22:31

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