Comparative susceptibility of mosquito populations in North Queensland, Australia to oral infection with dengue virus

Ye, Yixin H., Ng, Tat Siong, Frentiu, Francesca D., Walker, Thomas, van den Hurk, Andrew F., O'Neill, Scott L., Beebe, Nigel W., & McGraw, Elizabeth A. (2014) Comparative susceptibility of mosquito populations in North Queensland, Australia to oral infection with dengue virus. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 90(3), pp. 422-430.

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Abstract

Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus, with at least 40% of the world’s population at risk of infection each year. In Australia, dengue is not endemic, but viremic travelers trigger outbreaks involving hundreds of cases. We compared the susceptibility of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from two geographically isolated populations with two strains of dengue virus serotype 2. We found, interestingly, that mosquitoes from a city with no history of dengue were more susceptible to virus than mosquitoes from an outbreak-prone region, particularly with respect to one dengue strain. These findings suggest recent evolution of population-based differences in vector competence or different historical origins. Future genomic comparisons of these populations could reveal the genetic basis of vector competence and the relative role of selection and stochastic processes in shaping their differences. Lastly, we show the novel finding of a correlation between midgut dengue titer and titer in tissues colonized after dissemination.

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Scopus
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3 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 68390
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Publisher version of articles is free to read on journal website after 12 months
Additional URLs:
DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.13-0186
ISSN: 0002-9637
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ECOLOGY (060200) > Population Ecology (060207)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Infectious Agents (060502)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Virology (060506)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Deposited On: 13 Mar 2014 03:54
Last Modified: 22 Jan 2015 05:15

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