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Practice effects in three-dimensional sequential rapid aiming in Parkinson's disease

Smiley-Oyen, Ann L. , Worringham, Charles J., & Cross, Carol L. (2002) Practice effects in three-dimensional sequential rapid aiming in Parkinson's disease. Movement Disorders, 17(6), pp. 1196-1204.

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Abstract

One hypothesized role of the basal ganglia, based largely on findings in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, is the control of movement sequences. We examined changes in performance with practice of a movement sequence in PD patients and age-matched controls (n = 8 per group). Subjects practiced a complex three-dimensional sequential aiming task over 2 days, completing 180 trials, with the goal to minimize response time within specified accuracy limits. The results indicated that both groups became faster in planning the movement, and both groups moved more quickly through the sequence with practice. The PD group's decrease in movement time occurred primarily within the first 45 trials, whereas the control group continued to improve through the first 150 trials. Flight time (time between targets) to a small target decreased with practice in both groups, but flight time to a large target decreased only in the control group. This finding indicates that error corrective processes are more amenable to practice than ballistic processes in people with PD. There was little evidence that either group improved their performance by planning shorter (lower) trajectories, but rather increased mean velocity. Contact time (time on target) decreased with practice in both groups, and there were no group differences. These data indicate that practice can improve performance, both in planning and in specific execution processes.

Impact and interest:

12 citations in Scopus
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11 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 685
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Parkinson's disease, aiming, sequences, motor learning, practice, kinematics
DOI: 10.1002/mds.10278
ISSN: 0885-3185
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Sensory Processes Perception and Performance (170112)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NEUROSCIENCES (110900)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Motor Control (110603)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NEUROSCIENCES (110900) > Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases (110904)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons
Copyright Statement: The definite version is available on publication at www3.interscience.wiley.com
Deposited On: 29 Jun 2005
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2011 03:31

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