Food reward sensitivity predicts overconsumption of high-fat snack food

Fay, Stephanie H., White, Melanie J., Finlayson, Graham, & King, Neil A. (2014) Food reward sensitivity predicts overconsumption of high-fat snack food. In Gallardo-Pujol, David (Ed.) ISSID2013: International Society for the Study of Individual Differences Annual Meeting 2013, 22-25 July 2013, Barcelona, Spain.

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Abstract

Overconsumption of snack foods has been linked to rising rates of obesity, with our ‘obesogenic’ environment and its abundance of palatable, high-calorie foods and associated cues especially implicated. However, it is clear that some individuals are particularly susceptible to overconsumption and weight gain. It was hypothesised that individuals sensitive to the rewarding properties of palatable foods, and associated stimuli, would show elevated consumption. Snack food intake was measured in 50 adults (mean age 34.5 years, BMI 23.9 kg/m2, 56% female) in a repeated measures design, both with and without a ‘food cue’. Trait (BIS/BAS scales), behavioural (computerised CARROT) and food reward were assessed. Sensitivity to food reward, but not generalised reward, was positively associated with snack food intake. This relationship was not affected by the presence of a food cue. Findings are discussed in the context of implications for weight management.

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ID Code: 68703
Item Type: Conference Item (Other)
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Paper presented in "International Society for the Study of Individual Differences Annual Meeting 2013", Barcelona, Spain.
Abstract published in Personality and Individual Differences Volume 60, Supplement, April 2014, Pages S13
Additional URLs:
DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2013.07.356
ISSN: 0191-8869
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > OTHER PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (179900) > Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified (179999)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 Elsevier
Deposited On: 18 Mar 2014 22:16
Last Modified: 18 Jul 2015 21:32

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