Thinking Pedagogically

Graham, Linda J. (2010) Thinking Pedagogically. In Graham, Linda J. (Ed.) (De)Constructing ADHD : Critical Guidance for Teachers and Teacher Educators. Peter Lang, New York, pp. 205-220.

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Abstract

Despite the dominancy of medical explanations for difficult child behavior, the shifting sands that lie beneath the ADHD construct provide an unstable foundation for educational practice. It can be somewhat liberating to remember that “attention deficit hyperactivity disorder” is a label (one of many, including minimal brain damage and hyperkinetic reaction of childhood) that the medical domain has coined to both group and describe certain challenging behaviors exhibited by children and young people (see Smith, Chapter 2). The label is but one conceptualization of what these behaviors mean and, despite the existence of powerful lobby groups, it may not be the best way forward. In what follows, I present an alternative typology to the medical conceptualization by describing some common issues that bring this group of children to attention. In an effort to introduce educationally useful responses to students who are difficult to teach, I will then outline what classroom teachers need to recognize in order to work with these students and realize their potential. To assist teachers in thinking pedagogically, these observations are coupled with well-known and relevant qualities of good teaching to remind teachers of what they already know and to reacquaint them with the power of that knowledge.

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ID Code: 68763
Item Type: Book Chapter
Keywords: disruptive behaviour, inclusive education
ISBN: 9781433106392
ISSN: 1548-7210
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EDUCATION (130000) > SPECIALIST STUDIES IN EDUCATION (130300) > Special Education and Disability (130312)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Cultural & Professional Learning
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Please consult the author
Deposited On: 18 Mar 2014 22:50
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2014 00:36

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