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The prevalence and characteristics of alcohol related incidents requiring police attendance

Palk, Gavan R., Davey, Jeremy D., & Freeman, James E. (2007) The prevalence and characteristics of alcohol related incidents requiring police attendance. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 68(4), pp. 575-581.

Abstract

Purpose – To investigate the prevalence and impact of alcohol-related incidents on police resources in a major Australian region. Design/methodology/approach – Participants in the current study were first response operational police officers who completed a modified activity log over a 5 week period, identifying the type, time spent on, and the number of alcohol-related incidents that were attended (N = 31090). Findings - The findings indicate that a substantial proportion of current police work involves attendance at alcohol-related incidents i.e., 25%. The most common incidents police attended were vehicle and/or traffic matters, disturbances and offences against property, which were also the most likely to involve alcohol. These events are most likely to occur in the early hours of the morning on the weekends, and importantly, usually take longer for police to complete than non-alcohol related incidents.
Originality/value - The findings highlight the pervasive nature of alcohol across a range of offences and provides a current perspective regarding the considerable impact that alcohol-related crime has on policing resources.

Impact and interest:

12 citations in Scopus
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8 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 6887
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see hypertext link) or contact the author: g.palk@qut.edu.au
Additional URLs:
ISSN: 0096-882X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200) > Criminology not elsewhere classified (160299)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Rutgers University
Deposited On: 11 May 2007
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:34

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