Climate change and children’s health : a call for research on what works to protect children

Xu, Zhiwei, Perry, Sheffield, Hu, Wenbiao, Su, Hong, Yu, Weiwei, Qi, Xin, & Tong, Shilu (2012) Climate change and children’s health : a call for research on what works to protect children. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 9(9), pp. 3298-3316.

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Climate change is affecting and will increasingly influence human health and wellbeing. Children are particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change. An extensive literature review regarding the impact of climate change on children’s health was conducted in April 2012 by searching electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science, as well as relevant websites, such as IPCC and WHO. Climate change affects children’s health through increased air pollution, more weather-related disasters, more frequent and intense heat waves, decreased water quality and quantity, food shortage and greater exposure to toxicants. As a result, children experience greater risk of mental disorders, malnutrition, infectious diseases, allergic diseases and respiratory diseases. Mitigation measures like reducing carbon pollution emissions, and adaptation measures such as early warning systems and post-disaster counseling are strongly needed. Future health research directions should focus on:

(1) identifying whether climate change impacts on children will be modified by gender, age and socioeconomic status; (2) refining outcome measures of children’s vulnerability to climate change; (3) projecting children’s disease burden under climate change scenarios; (4) exploring children’s disease burden related to climate change in low-income countries, and ; (5) identifying the most cost-effective mitigation and adaptation actions from a children’s health perspective.

Impact and interest:

18 citations in Scopus
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17 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 69537
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph9093298
ISSN: 1660-4601
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Copyright Statement: This article is an open access article
distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license
Deposited On: 28 Mar 2014 04:20
Last Modified: 18 May 2014 20:08

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