Does improving school level attendance lead to improved school level achievement? An empirical study of indigenous educational policy in Australia

Ladwig, James G. & Luke, Allan (2013) Does improving school level attendance lead to improved school level achievement? An empirical study of indigenous educational policy in Australia. Australian Educational Researcher, 41(2), pp. 171-194.

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Abstract

Current federal government policy initiatives in Aboriginal education and social welfare reform are based on assumptions about the relationship between increased attendance and increased student performance on standardized tests. There are empirical assumptions underlying these policy interventions and their accompanying public debates. Our aim here is to empirically explore the relationships between patterns of student attendance and patterns of student achievement in schools with significant cohorts of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students at the school level. Based on an analysis of the publicly available data reported on the ‘MySchool’ website, we find that reforms and policies around attendance have not and are unlikely to generate patterns of improved achievement. Questions about the rationale and rhetoric of government policy focused at the school level as opposed to the need to focus on pedagogy and curriculum are discussed.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 69639
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1007/s13384-013-0131-y
ISSN: 2210-5328
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Deposited On: 02 Apr 2014 01:13
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2014 00:42

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