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Mass media campaigns reduce the incidence of drinking and driving

Tay, Richard S. (2005) Mass media campaigns reduce the incidence of drinking and driving. Evidence-Based Healthcare and Public Health, 9(1), pp. 26-29.

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Abstract

Question: Do mass media campaigns result in reduced drunk-driving and alcohol related crashes? Study Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis. Main results: Eight of 11 studies identified met inclusion criteria. Mass media campaigns on drink driving reduce alcohol-related crashes in the period during or after the campaign (median decease: 13%; interquartile range [IQR] 6% to 14%; see Results table). Mass media campaigns reduced crashes resulting in injury by a median of 10% (IQR 6% to 15%). Mass media campaigns resulted in large savings in medical costs, property damage and productivity (Victoria campaign cost $403,174 per month versus savings of $8,324,532 per month; Wichita campaign cost $454,060 versus savings of $3,431,305; Kansas City campaign cost $322,660 versus savings of $3,676,399). There were no significant differences in outcomes among message types emphasising legal, social or health consequences of drunk-driving. Authors’ conclusions: Mass media campaigns significantly reduce drunk-driving and alcohol-related crashes. These campaigns result in large savings.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 6970
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see link) or contact the author. Author contact details: r.tay@qut.edu.au
Keywords: mass media campaigns, drink driving, alcohol use, systematic review
DOI: 10.1016/j.ehbc.2004.11.013
ISSN: 1744-2249
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > TRANSPORTATION AND FREIGHT SERVICES (150700) > Road Transportation and Freight Services (150703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 Elsevier
Deposited On: 16 Apr 2007
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2009 15:36

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