#ausvotes Mark Two : Twitter in the 2013 Australian Federal Election

Bruns, Axel, Highfield, Tim, & Sauter, Theresa (2013) #ausvotes Mark Two : Twitter in the 2013 Australian Federal Election. In Selected Papers of Internet Research, Association of Internet Researchers, Denver, CO.

Abstract

In this paper, we explore the use of Twitter as a political tool in the 2013 Australian Federal Election. We employ a ‘big data’ approach that combines qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis. By tracking the accounts of politicians and parties, and the tweeting activity to and around these accounts, as well as conversations on particular hashtagged topics, we gain a comprehensive insight into the ways in which Twitter is employed in the campaigning strategies of different parties. We compare and contrast the use of Twitter by political actors with its adoption by citizens as a tool for political conversation and participation. Our study provides an important longitudinal counterpoint, and opportunity for comparison, to the use of Twitter in previous Australian federal and state elections. Furthermore, we offer innovative methodologies for data gathering and evaluation that can contribute to the comparative study of the political uses of Twitter across diverse national media and political systems.

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ID Code: 69877
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Twitter, politics, Australia, elections, big data
ISSN: 2162-3317
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Communication Studies (200101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies (200102)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Media Studies (200104)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Current > Schools > School of Media, Entertainment & Creative Arts
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 The Author(s)
Copyright Statement: This article is ©2013 Authors, and licensed under CC BY-NC-ND.
Deposited On: 07 Apr 2014 01:07
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2014 07:17

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