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Commentary: Exploring the effects of a road safety campaign on the perceptions and intentions of the target and non-target audiences to drink and drive

Tay, Richard S. (2002) Commentary: Exploring the effects of a road safety campaign on the perceptions and intentions of the target and non-target audiences to drink and drive. Traffic Injury Prevention, 3(3), pp. 195-200.

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Abstract

This commentary explores the efficacy of a road safety advertising campaign in changing drivers' perceptions and intentions to drink and drive. Using data collected via a survey on a sample of students at Lincoln University in New Zealand in October 1999, this study found that the campaign appeared to be successful in increasing the perceived apprehension and crash risks associated with drunk driving and decreasing the intentions of the drivers to drink and drive. However, contrary to expectation, the campaign did not elicit a stronger change in the target audience relative to the nontarget audience. There was partial evidence to support the publicity campaign, but some refinements could be made to increase its efficacy among the target audience. In particular, the level of fear arousal should be moderated and the audience should be provided with effective and viable coping strategies to address the threat associated with drunk driving.

Impact and interest:

18 citations in Scopus
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ID Code: 7055
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see link) or contact the author. Author contact details: r.tay@qut.edu.au
Keywords: advertising, behavioural intentions, drunk driving, perceived risks, road safety
DOI: 10.1080/15389580213651
ISSN: 1538-957X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > MARKETING (150500) > Marketing Communications (150502)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Psychology not elsewhere classified (170199)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2002 Taylor & Francis
Copyright Statement: First published in Traffic Injury Prevention 3(3):pp. 195-200.
Deposited On: 20 Apr 2007
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2009 17:27

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