General self-efficacy influences affective task reactions during a work simulation : the temporal effects of changes in workload at different levels of control

Parker, Stacey L., Jimmieson, Nerina L., & Johnson, Kathryn M. (2013) General self-efficacy influences affective task reactions during a work simulation : the temporal effects of changes in workload at different levels of control. Anxiety Stress and Coping, 26(2), pp. 217-239.

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Abstract

This study investigated the effects of workload, control, and general self-efficacy on affective task reactions (i.e., demands-ability fit, active coping, and anxiety) during a work simulation. The main goals were:

(1) to determine the extent general self-efficacy moderates the effects of demand and control on affective task reactions, and;

(2) to determine if this varies as a function of changes in workload.

Participants (N=141) completed an inbox activity under conditions of low or high control and within low and high workload conditions. The order of trials varied so that workload increased or decreased. Results revealed individuals with high general self-efficacy reported better demands-abilities fit and active coping as well as less anxiety. Three interactive effects were found. First, it was found that high control increased demands-abilities fit from trial 1 to trial 2, but only when workload decreased. Second, it was found that low efficacious individuals active coping increased in trial 2, but only under high control. Third, it was found that high control helped high efficacious individuals manage anxiety when workload decreased. However, for individuals with low general self-efficacy, neither high nor low control alleviated anxiety (i.e., whether workload increased or decreased over time).

Impact and interest:

3 citations in Scopus
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4 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 71595
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Published online 1 February 2012.
Keywords: Workload, Control, General self-efficacy, Anxiety, Coping, Person-environment fit
DOI: 10.1080/10615806.2011.651616
ISSN: 1061-5806
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Current > Schools > School of Management
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 Taylor & Francis
Deposited On: 14 May 2014 23:32
Last Modified: 16 May 2014 01:41

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