Intervening to reduce workplace sitting time : how and when do changes to sitting time occur?

Stephens, Samantha K., Winkler, Elisabeth A.H., Trost, Stewart G., Dunstan, David W., Eakin, Elizabeth G., Chastin, Sebastien F.M., & Healy, Genevieve N. (2014) Intervening to reduce workplace sitting time : how and when do changes to sitting time occur? British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48, pp. 1037-1042.

View at publisher



To investigate how and when changes in workplace sitting time occurred following a workplace intervention to inform evaluation of intervention success.


The 4-week Stand Up Comcare study (June–September 2011) aimed to reduce workplace sitting time via regularly interrupting and replacing sitting time throughout the day. Activity monitor (activPAL3) workplace data from control (n=22) and intervention participants (n=21) were analysed. Differences in the number and usual duration of sitting bouts were used to evaluate how change occurred. To examine when change occurred, intervention effects were compared by hour since starting work and hour of the workday. Change in workplace activity (sitting, standing, stepping) was examined to further inform alignment with intervention messages. Individual variability was examined in how and when the change occurred.


Overall, behavioural changes aligned with intervention aims. All intervention participants reduced total workplace sitting time, though there was wide individual variability observed (range −29 to −262 min per 8 h workday). On average, intervention participants reduced number of sitting bouts (−4.6 bouts (95% CI −10.1 to 1.0), p=0.106) and usual sitting bout duration (−5.6 min (95% CI −9.8 to −1.4, p=0.011)) relative to controls. Sitting time reductions were observed across the workday, though intervention effects varied by hour of the day (p=0.015). The intervention group successfully adopted the Stand Up and Sit Less intervention messages across the day.


These analyses confirmed that this workplace intervention successfully modified sitting behaviour as intended (ie, fewer and shorter sitting bouts, with changes occurring throughout the day).

Impact and interest:

15 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
12 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

62 since deposited on 15 May 2014
33 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 71669
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2014-093524
ISSN: 0306-3674
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 The Author(s), Produced by BMJ Publishing Group Ltd under licence
Deposited On: 15 May 2014 22:54
Last Modified: 02 Mar 2015 12:26

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page