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Explaining variations in the knowledge economy in three small wealthy countries

Parker, Rachel L. (2004) Explaining variations in the knowledge economy in three small wealthy countries. Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, 16(3), pp. 343-366.

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Abstract

At a broad level, it has been shown that different institutional contexts, policy regimes and business systems affect the kinds of activities in which a nation specialises. This paper is concerned with the way in which different national business systems affect the nature of participation of a nation in the knowledge economy. The paper seeks to explain cross-national variations in the knowledge economy in the Australia, Denmark and Sweden with reference to dominant characteristics of the business system.

Although Australia, Denmark and Sweden are all small wealthy countries, they each have quite distinctive business systems. Australia has been regarded as a variant of the competitive business system and has generally been described as an entrepreneurial economy with a large small firm population. In contrast Sweden has a coordinated business system that has favoured large industrial firms. The Danish variant of the coordinated model, with its well-developed vocational training system, is distinguishable by its large population of networked small and medium size enterprises.

The three countries also differ significantly on two dimensions of participation in the knowledge economy. First, there is cross-national variation in patterns of specialisation in knowledge intensive industries and services. Second, the institutional infrastructure of the knowledge economy (or the existing stock of knowledge and competence in the economy, the potential for generation and diffusion of new knowledge and the capacity for commercialisation of new ideas) differs across the three countries. This paper seeks to explain variations in these two dimensions of the knowledge economy with reference to characteristics of the business system in the three countries.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
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4 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 7171
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Rachel Parker, ICT, knowledge economy, business systems
DOI: 10.1080/0953732042000251133
ISSN: 0953-7325
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (150300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (150300) > Small Business Management (150314)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 Taylor & Francis
Copyright Statement: First published in Technology Analysis and Strategic Management 16(3):pp. 343-366.
Deposited On: 27 Apr 2007
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:19

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