National and state-level politics on social media : Twitter, Australian political discussions, and the online commentariat

Highfield, Tim (2013) National and state-level politics on social media : Twitter, Australian political discussions, and the online commentariat. International Journal of Electronic Governance, 6(4), pp. 342-360.

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Abstract

This paper examines the use of Twitter for long-term discussions around Australian politics, at national and state levels, tracking two hashtags during 2012: #auspol, denoting national political topics, and #wapol, which provides a case study of state politics (representing Western Australia). The long-term data collection provides the opportunity to analyse how the Twitter audience responds to Australian politics: which themes attract the most attention and which accounts act as focal points for these discussions. The paper highlights differences in the coverage of state and national politics. For #auspol, a small number of accounts are responsible for the majority of tweets, with politicians invoked but not directly contributing to the discussion. In contrast, #wapol stimulates a much lower level of tweeting. This example also demonstrates that, in addition to citizen accounts, traditional participants within political debate, such as politicians and journalists, are among the active contributors to state-oriented discussions on Twitter.

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Scopus
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ID Code: 71853
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: social media, politics, Twitter, Australia, public debate, commentariat, hashtags, Western Australia, political commentary, everyday politics
DOI: 10.1504/IJEG.2013.060648
ISSN: 1742-7517
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies (200102)
Divisions: Past > Research Centres > ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Past > Schools > School of Media, Entertainment & Creative Arts
Copyright Owner: Copyright © 2013 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.
Deposited On: 20 May 2014 23:51
Last Modified: 23 May 2014 00:17

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