Advances in population surveillance for physical activity and sedentary behavior : reliability and validity of time use surveys

Van Der Ploeg, H.P., Merom, D., Chau, J.Y., Bittman, M., Trost, S.G., & Bauman, A.E. (2010) Advances in population surveillance for physical activity and sedentary behavior : reliability and validity of time use surveys. American Journal of Epidemiology, 172(10), pp. 1199-1206.

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Abstract

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Many countries conduct regular national time use surveys, some of which date back as far as the 1960s. Time use surveys potentially provide more detailed and accurate national estimates of the prevalence of sedentary and physical activity behavior than more traditional self-report surveillance systems. In this study, the authors determined the reliability and validity of time use surveys for assessing sedentary and physical activity behavior. In 2006 and 2007, participants (n = 134) were recruited from work sites in the Australian state of New South Wales. Participants completed a 2-day time use diary twice, 7 days apart, and wore an accelerometer. The 2 diaries were compared for test-retest reliability, and comparison with the accelerometer determined concurrent validity. Participants with similar activity patterns during the 2 diary periods showed reliability intraclass correlations of 0.74 and 0.73 for nonoccupational sedentary behavior and moderate/vigorous physical activity, respectively. Comparison of the diary with the accelerometer showed Spearman correlations of 0.57-0.59 and 0.45-0.69 for nonoccupational sedentary behavior and moderate/vigorous physical activity, respectively. Time use surveys appear to be more valid for population surveillance of nonoccupational sedentary behavior and health-enhancing physical activity than more traditional surveillance systems. National time use surveys could be used to retrospectively study nonoccupational sedentary and physical activity behavior over the past 5 decades.

Impact and interest:

51 citations in Scopus
49 citations in Web of Science®
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ID Code: 72166
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Articles free to read on journal website after 12 months
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Keywords: Epidemiologic measurements, exercise, population surveillance, public health, sedentary lifestyle, accelerometer, comparative study, correlation, epidemiology, lifestyle, reliability analysis, spatiotemporal analysis, survival, adult, article, Australia, concurrent validity, controlled study, correlation coefficient, female, health survey, human, male, normal human, occupation, physical activity, reliability, retrospective study, sitting, test retest reliability, validity, work, Adolescent, Data Collection, Humans, Medical Records, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Physiologic, Motor Activity, New South Wales, Reproducibility of Results, Young Adult
DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwq265
ISSN: 0002-9262
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Deposited On: 28 May 2014 01:26
Last Modified: 19 May 2017 02:34

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