Psychosocial correlates of physical activity in white and African-American girls

Trost, Stewart G., Pate, Russell R., Dowda, Marsha, Ward, Dianne S., Felton, Gwen M., & Saunders, Ruth (2002) Psychosocial correlates of physical activity in white and African-American girls. Journal of Adolescent Health, 31(3), pp. 226-233.

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Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the relative utility of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in explaining intentions and physical activity behavior in white and African-American eighth-grade girls.

Methods

One-thousand-thirty white and 1114 African-American eighth-grade girls (mean age 13.6 ± 0.7 years) from 31 middle schools in South Carolina completed a 3-day physical activity recall and a questionnaire assessing attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, and intentions related to regular participation in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Results

Among Whites, 17% of the variance in intentions was contributed by subjective norms and attitude, with intentions accounting for 8% of the variance in MVPA. The addition of perceived behavioral control and self-efficacy to the TRA significantly improved the prediction of intentions and MVPA accounting for 40% and 10% of the variance, respectively. Among African-Americans, subjective norms and attitude accounted for 13% of the variance in intentions, with intentions accounting for only 3% of the variance in MVPA. The addition of perceived behavioral control and self-efficacy to the TRA significantly improved the prediction of intentions and MVPA accounting for 28% and 5% of the variance, respectively.

Conclusions

The results provided limited empirical support for the TPB among white adolescent girls; however, our findings suggest that the planned behavior framework has limited utility among African-American adolescent girls. The relatively weak link between intentions and MVPA observed in both population groups suggest that constructs external to the TPB may be more important mediators of physical activity behavior in adolescent girls.

Impact and interest:

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52 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 72257
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: ISI Document Delivery No.: 588DG
Times Cited: 43
Cited Reference Count: 33
Trost, SG Pate, RR Dowda, M Ward, DS Felton, G Saunders, R
Elsevier science inc
New york; <Go to ISI>://WOS:000177685300003
Keywords: adolescents, exercise, Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned, Behavior, self-efficacy, determinants, planned behavior, activity interventions, exercise behavior, reasoned, action, youth, adolescents, children, questionnaires
DOI: 10.1016/s1054-139x(02)00375-0
ISSN: 1054-139X
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Deposited On: 29 May 2014 23:24
Last Modified: 29 May 2014 23:24

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