Acquisition of estrogen independence and antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer : association with the invasive and metastatic phenotype

Brunner, N., Johnson, M.D., Holst-Hansen, C., Kiilgaard, J.F., Thompson, E.W., & Clarke, R. (1995) Acquisition of estrogen independence and antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer : association with the invasive and metastatic phenotype. Endocrine Related Cancer, 2(1), pp. 27-35.

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Abstract

A significant percentage of human breast cancer (HBC) is dependent upon the ovarian hormone estrogen for its onset and progression. The presence or lack of estrogen receptors (ERs) in human breast cancer is an important determinant both of prognosis and of choice of treatment - a poorer prognosis being associated with ER–ve disease. Cell lines established from human breast cancer provide models for breast cancer in various stages of progression (Engel & Young 1978). When grown as tumors in athymic nude mice, these lines represent the major in vivo experimental model for HBC studies (Brünner et al 1987). The ease of both in vitro and in vivo maintenance, the human derivation of the tissue, and the similarities in plasma estrogen levels between ovariectomized nude mice and postmenopausal women (Seibert et al. 1983, Brünner et al. 1986), make the growth of human breast cancer cell lines in nude mice an attractive...

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ID Code: 72513
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
DOI: 10.1677/erc.0.0020027
ISSN: 1479-6821
Deposited On: 03 Jun 2014 03:44
Last Modified: 05 Feb 2015 01:17

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