Deadly Choices or deadly choices? An ethnography of health promotion practice with Indigenous Australians

McPhail-Bell, Karen (2014) Deadly Choices or deadly choices? An ethnography of health promotion practice with Indigenous Australians. In (Ed.) IUIH/Lowitja Symposium - Innovations in Urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health : Closing the Gap, 20 June 2014, University of Queensland, St Lucia. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

This presentation provides an overview of my PhD research, which links with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) and its Deadly Choices team. In the presentation, I introduce my critique of mainstream health promotion practice, highlighting the need for decolonisation of health promotion and the opportunity to learn from health promotion practice that acknowledges Indigenous knowledge, skills and perspectives. I also overview my ethnographic research methodology, which enabled me to be a participant observer with IUIH health promotion practitioners. I canvas some of my findings to date, according to two key areas: the unique way Deadly Choices applies leadership as its model of health promotion practice; and the range of innovative engagement strategies they employed, including the Deadly Choices brand and social media. I conclude by highlighting the counter-narrative and contrast that Deadly Choices provides compared to traditional health promotion approaches with Indigenous people, and identify lessons for decolonisation of heath promotion more broadly.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 72990
Item Type: Conference Item (Presentation)
Refereed: No
Keywords: Health promotion, Indigenous, Culture, Ethnography, Leadership, Community engagement
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (111701)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900) > Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified (169999)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Deposited On: 22 Jun 2014 23:04
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2014 22:12

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