Social engineering in social networking sites : the art of impersonation

Algarni, Abdullah, Xu, Yue, & Chan, Taizan (2014) Social engineering in social networking sites : the art of impersonation. In Proceedings of The 11th IEEE International Conference on Services Computing (CSS 2014), IEEE Computer Society, Anchorage, Alaska, USA, pp. 797-804.

View at publisher

Abstract

Social networking sites (SNSs), with their large number of users and large information base, seem to be the perfect breeding ground for exploiting the vulnerabilities of people, who are considered the weakest link in security. Deceiving, persuading, or influencing people to provide information or to perform an action that will benefit the attacker is known as “social engineering.” Fraudulent and deceptive people use social engineering traps and tactics through SNSs to trick users into obeying them, accepting threats, and falling victim to various crimes such as phishing, sexual abuse, financial abuse, identity theft, and physical crime. Although organizations, researchers, and practitioners recognize the serious risks of social engineering, there is a severe lack of understanding and control of such threats. This may be partly due to the complexity of human behaviors in approaching, accepting, and failing to recognize social engineering tricks. This research aims to investigate the impact of source characteristics on users’ susceptibility to social engineering victimization in SNSs, particularly Facebook. Using grounded theory method, we develop a model that explains what and how source characteristics influence Facebook users to judge the attacker as credible.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
1 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

186 since deposited on 06 Jul 2014
39 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 73380
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: social engineering, social networking sites, information security management, source credibility, trust management, impersonation, deception
DOI: 10.1109/SCC.2014.108
ISBN: 978-1-4799-5065-2
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > TECHNOLOGY (100000)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Current > Schools > School of Information Systems
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 IEEE
Copyright Statement: Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.
Deposited On: 06 Jul 2014 22:41
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2014 00:29

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page