Nanoparticle emissions from a fleet of CNG buses in transient and steady state operation

Ristovski, Zoran, Meyer, Nickolas K., Jayaratne, Rohan, Weitten, Oliver, & Morawska, Lidia (2006) Nanoparticle emissions from a fleet of CNG buses in transient and steady state operation. In 10th ETH-Conference on Combustion Generated Nanoparticles, 21-23 August 2006, ETH Zentrum, Zurich. (Unpublished)

Abstract

Particle emission measurements from a fleet of 14 CNG and 5 Diesel buses were measured both for transient and steady state mode s on a chassis dynamometer with a CVS dilution system. Several transient DT80 cycles and 4 steady sate modes (0, 25, 50 100% of maximum load) were measured for each bus tested. Particle number concentration data was collected by three CPC’s (TSI 3022, 3010 3782WCPC) having D50 cut-offs set to 5, 10 and 20nm respectively. The size distributions were measured with a TSI 3080 SMPS with a 3025 CPC during the steady state modes. Particle mass emissions were measured with a TSI Dustrak. Particle mass emissions for Diesel buses were upto 2 orders of magnitude higher than for CNG buses. Particle number emissions during steady state modes for Diesel busses were 2 to 5 times higher than for CNG busses for all of the tested loads. On the other hand for the DT80 transient cycle particle number emissions were up to 3 times higher for the CNG buses. More detailed analysis of the transient cycles revealed that the reason for this was due to high particle number emissions from CNG busses during the acceleration parts of the cycles. Particles emitted by the CNG busses during acceleration were in the nucleation mode with the majority being smaller than 10nm. Volatility measurements have also shown that they were highly volatile.

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ID Code: 74614
Item Type: Conference Item (Poster)
Refereed: No
Keywords: natural gas, environmental pollution, engine emission, drive cycles, nanoparticles
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EARTH SCIENCES (040000) > ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES (040100) > Atmospheric Aerosols (040101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING (090200) > Automotive Combustion and Fuel Engineering (incl. Alternative/Renewable Fuels) (090201)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > TECHNOLOGY (100000) > NANOTECHNOLOGY (100700) > Environmental Nanotechnology (100701)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (120500) > Transport Planning (120506)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Chemistry, Physics & Mechanical Engineering
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2006 The Author(s)
Deposited On: 01 Aug 2014 01:24
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2014 01:24

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