Geographical distribution of human Schistosoma japonicum infection in the Philippines : tools to support disease control and further elimination

Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo J., Salamat, Maria S., Leonardo, Lydia, Gray, Darren J., Carabin, Hélène, Halton, Kate, McManus, Donald P., Williams, Gail, Rivera, Pilarita, Saniel, Ophelia, Hernandez, Leda, Yakob, Laith, McGarvey, Stephen, & Clements, Archie C.A. (2014) Geographical distribution of human Schistosoma japonicum infection in the Philippines : tools to support disease control and further elimination. International Journal for Parasitology, 44(13), pp. 977-984.

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Abstract

S. japonicum infection is believed to be endemic in 28 of the 80 provinces of the Philippines and the most recent data on schistosomiasis prevalence have shown considerable variability between provinces. In order to increase the efficient allocation of parasitic disease control resources in the country, we aimed to describe the small scale spatial variation in S. japonicum prevalence across the Philippines, quantify the role of the physical environment in driving the spatial variation of S. japonicum, and develop a predictive risk map of S. japonicum infection. Data on S. japonicum infection from 35,754 individuals across the country were geo-located at the barangay level and included in the analysis. The analysis was then stratified geographically for Luzon, the Visayas and Mindanao. Zero-inflated binomial Bayesian geostatistical models of S. japonicum prevalence were developed and diagnostic uncertainty was incorporated. Results of the analysis show that in the three regions, males and individuals aged ≥ 20 years had significantly higher prevalence of S. japonicum compared with females and children <5 years. The role of the environmental variables differed between regions of the Philippines. S. japonicum infection was widespread in the Visayas whereas it was much more focal in Luzon and Mindanao.

This analysis revealed significant spatial variation in prevalence of S. japonicum infection in the Philippines. This suggests that a spatially targeted approach to schistosomiasis interventions, including mass drug administration, is warranted. When financially possible, additional schistosomiasis surveys should be prioritized to areas identified to be at high risk, but which were underrepresented in our dataset.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 75189
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Schistosoma japonicum, risk mapping, Philippines, disease control, disease elimination
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2014.06.010
ISSN: 0020-7519
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Infectious Diseases (110309)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Epidemiology (111706)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance) (111711)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Funding:
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Journal of Parasitology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Parasitology, VOL 44, ISSUE 13, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2014.06.010
Deposited On: 19 Aug 2014 01:07
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2015 16:21

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