Using the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) to explore conflict between different road user groups when making right hand turns at urban intersections

Salmon, Paul M., Lenné, Michael G., Walker, Guy H., Stanton, Neville A., & Filtness, Ashleigh (2015) Using the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) to explore conflict between different road user groups when making right hand turns at urban intersections. Ergonomics, 57(11), pp. 1628-1642.

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Abstract

Collisions between different types of road users at intersections form a substantial component of the road toll. This paper presents an analysis of driver, cyclist, motorcyclist and pedestrian behaviour at intersections that involved the application of an integrated suite of ergonomics methods, the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) framework, to on-road study data. EAST was used to analyse behaviour at three intersections using data derived from an on-road study of driver, cyclist, motorcyclist and pedestrian behaviour. The analysis shows the differences in behaviour and cognition across the different road user groups and pinpoints instances where this may be creating conflicts between different road users. The role of intersection design in creating these differences in behaviour and resulting conflicts is discussed. It is concluded that currently intersections are not designed in a way that supports behaviour across the four forms of road user studied. Interventions designed to improve intersection safety are discussed.

Impact and interest:

3 citations in Scopus
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4 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 76287
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: intersections, road safety, EAST, systems analysis, drivers, cyclists, motorcyclists, pedestrians
DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2014.945491
ISSN: 1366-5847
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Deposited On: 15 Oct 2014 22:48
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2015 00:55

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