Neural bases for individual differences in the subjective experience of short durations (less than 2 seconds)

Tipples, Jason, Brattan, Victoria, & Johnston, Pat (2013) Neural bases for individual differences in the subjective experience of short durations (less than 2 seconds). PLoS ONE, 8(1), e54669.

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Abstract

The current research was designed to establish whether individual differences in timing performance predict neural activation in the areas that subserve the perception of short durations ranging between 400 and 1600 milliseconds. Seventeen participants completed both a temporal bisection task and a control task, in a mixed fMRI design. In keeping with previous research, there was increased activation in a network of regions typically active during time perception including the right supplementary motor area (SMA) and right pre-SMA and basal ganglia (including the putamen and right pallidum). Furthermore, correlations between neural activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus and SMA and timing performance corroborate the results of a recent meta-analysis and are further evidence that the SMA forms part of a neural clock that is responsible for the accumulation of temporal information. Specifically, subjective lengthening of the perceived duration were associated with increased activation in both the right SMA (and right pre-SMA) and right inferior frontal gyrus.

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7 citations in Scopus
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5 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 77368
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: This research was funded by the University of York. VB was partially supported by a C2D2 Research Priming Grant. The funders had no role in study
design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0054669
ISSN: 1932-6203
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Sensory Processes Perception and Performance (170112)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2013 Tipples et al.
Copyright Statement: This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits
unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Deposited On: 05 Nov 2014 23:01
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2014 22:54

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