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Factors predicting intentions to speed in a work and personal vehicle

Newnam, Sharon A., Watson, Barry C., & Murray, Will (2004) Factors predicting intentions to speed in a work and personal vehicle. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 7(4-5), pp. 287-300.

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Abstract

The available evidence suggests that people who drive for work purposes engage in less safe driving practices than other drivers. The study examined this issue by surveying 204 people who drive for work purposes, in four different vehicle fleets. It was predicted that work-related drivers would report a higher intention to speed in a work vehicle than their personal vehicle. Additionally, the constructs within the Theory of Planned Behaviour, along with anticipated regret, were used to predict intentions to speed in the two settings. Contrary to prediction, the participants reported a lower intention to speed, t (201) = 4.19, p < .001, in a work vehicle than their personal vehicle. Further analysis revealed that the intentions of drivers in the two settings were significantly different in relation to anticipated regret, t (201) = 4.84, p < .001 and subjective norms, t (201) = 4.02, p < .001. Thus it would appear that these two psychological mechanisms discourage speeding behaviour in the work context. However, these findings need to be replicated with a larger sample of drivers from more diverse vehicle fleets.

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32 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 776
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Theory of Planned Behaviour, fleet safety, organisational culture, speeding
DOI: 10.1016/j.trf.2004.09.005
ISSN: 1369-8478
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Social and Community Psychology (170113)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Deposited On: 13 Oct 2005
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:05

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