Awards before and after the Nobel Prize : a Matthew effect and/or a ticket to one's own funeral?

Chan, Ho Fai, Gleeson, Laura, & Torgler, Benno (2014) Awards before and after the Nobel Prize : a Matthew effect and/or a ticket to one's own funeral? Research Evaluation, 23(3), pp. 210-220.

View at publisher

Abstract

The primary aim of this descriptive exploration of scientists’ life cycle award patterns is to evaluate whether awards breed further awards and identify researcher experiences after reception of the Nobel Prize. To achieve this goal, we collected data on the number of awards received each year for 50 years before and after Nobel Prize reception by all 1901–2000 Nobel laureates in physics, chemistry, and medicine or physiology. Our results indicate an increasing rate of awards before Nobel reception, reaching the summit precisely in the year of the Nobel Prize. After this pinnacle year, awards drop sharply. This result is confirmed by separate analyses of three different disciplines and by a random-effects negative binomial regression model. Such an effect, however, does not emerge for more recent Nobel laureates (1971–2000). In addition, Nobelists in medicine or physiology generate more awards shortly before and after prize reception, whereas laureates in chemistry attract more awards as time progresses.

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
3 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 78640
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Nobel Prize, Nobel laureates, Matthew effect, awards, recognition
DOI: 10.1093/reseval/rvu011
ISSN: 1471-5449
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Current > Schools > School of Economics & Finance
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 The Author
Deposited On: 12 Nov 2014 23:33
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2014 22:56

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page