Benefits of integrating complementarity into priority threat management

Chadés, Iadine, Nicol, Sam, van Leeuwen, Stephen, Walters, Belinda , Firn, Jennifer, Reeson, Andrew , Martin, Tara G., & Carwardine, Josie (2015) Benefits of integrating complementarity into priority threat management. Conservation Biology, 29(2), pp. 525-536.

View at publisher


Conservation decision tools based on cost-effectiveness analysis are used to assess threat management strategies for improving species persistence. These approaches rank alternative strategies by their benefit to cost ratio but may fail to identify the optimal sets of strategies to implement under limited budgets because they do not account for redundancies. We devised a multi objective optimization approach in which the complementarity principle is applied to identify the sets of threat management strategies that protect the most species for any budget. We used our approach to prioritize threat management strategies for 53 species of conservation concern in the Pilbara, Australia. We followed a structured elicitation approach to collect information on the benefits and costs of implementing 17 different conservation strategies during a 3-day workshop with 49 stakeholders and experts in the biodiversity, conservation, and management of the Pilbara. We compared the performance of our complementarity priority threat management approach with a current cost-effectiveness ranking approach. A complementary set of 3 strategies: domestic herbivore management, fire management and research, and sanctuaries provided all species with >50% chance of persistence for $4.7 million/year over 20 years. Achieving the same result cost almost twice as much ($9.71 million/year) when strategies were selected by their cost-effectiveness ranks alone. Our results show that complementarity of management benefits has the potential to double the impact of priority threat management approaches.

Impact and interest:

9 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
9 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 78758
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Australia, Conservation, Cost-effectiveness, Multiobjective Optimization, Pareto, Pilbara
DOI: 10.1111/cobi.12413
ISSN: 0888-8892
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Earth, Environmental & Biological Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 Society for Conservation Biology
Deposited On: 19 Nov 2014 00:53
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2015 06:01

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page