How are falls and fear of falling associated with objectively measured physical activity in a cohort of community-dwelling older men?

Jefferis, Barbara J., Iliffe, Steve, Kendrick, Denise, Kerse, Ngaire, Trost, Stewart, Lennon, Lucy T., Ash, Sarah, Sartini, Claudio, Morris, Richard W., Wannamethee, S. Goya, & Whincup, Peter H. (2014) How are falls and fear of falling associated with objectively measured physical activity in a cohort of community-dwelling older men? BMC Geriatrics, 14(114).

View at publisher (open access)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Falls affect approximately one third of community-dwelling older adults each year and have serious health and social consequences. Fear of falling (FOF) (lack of confidence in maintaining balance during normal activities) affects many older adults, irrespective of whether they have actually experienced falls. Both falls and fear of falls may result in restrictions of physical activity, which in turn have health consequences. To date the relation between (i) falls and (ii) fear of falling with physical activity have not been investigated using objectively measured activity data which permits examination of different intensities of activity and sedentary behaviour.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional study of 1680 men aged 71-92 years recruited from primary care practices who were part of an on-going population-based cohort. Men reported falls history in previous 12 months, FOF, health status and demographic characteristics. Men wore a GT3x accelerometer over the hip for 7 days.

RESULTS:

Among the 12% of men who had recurrent falls, daily activity levels were lower than among non-fallers; 942 (95% CI 503, 1381) fewer steps/day, 12(95% CI 2, 22) minutes less in light activity, 10(95% CI 5, 15) minutes less in moderate to vigorous PA [MVPA] and 22(95% CI 9, 35) minutes more in sedentary behaviour. 16% (n = 254) of men reported FOF, of whom 52% (n = 133) had fallen in the past year. Physical activity deficits were even greater in the men who reported that they were fearful of falling than in men who had fallen. Men who were fearful of falling took 1766(95% CI 1391, 2142) fewer steps/day than men who were not fearful, and spent 27(95% CI 18, 36) minutes less in light PA, 18(95% CI 13, 22) minutes less in MVPA, and 45(95% CI 34, 56) minutes more in sedentary behaviour. The significant differences in activity levels between (i) fallers and non-fallers and (ii) men who were fearful of falling or not fearful, were mediated by similar variables; lower exercise self-efficacy, fewer excursions from home and more mobility difficulties.

CONCLUSIONS:

Falls and in particular fear of falling are important barriers to older people gaining health benefits of walking and MVPA. Future studies should assess the longitudinal associations between falls and physical activity.

Impact and interest:

6 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
6 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

33 since deposited on 19 Nov 2014
9 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 78788
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Jefferis, Barbara J
Iliffe, Steve
Kendrick, Denise
Kerse, Ngaire
Trost, Stewart
Lennon, Lucy T
Ash, Sarah
Sartini, Claudio
Morris, Richard W
Wannamethee, S Goya
Whincup, Peter H
eng
England
2014/10/29 06:00
BMC Geriatr. 2014 Oct 27;14:114. doi: 10.1186/1471-2318-14-114.
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Falls; Fear of falls; Physical activity; Accelerometer; Older adults
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2318-14-114
ISSN: 1471-2318
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified (110699)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 Jefferis et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Copyright Statement: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Deposited On: 19 Nov 2014 04:21
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2014 01:38

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page